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salome belasco

Stress, Education and Productivity.

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As with nature, the strongest survive by adapting to change. Darwin’s Theory of Evolution and Natural Selection explained this concept. In the natural world, however, this change happens slowly but surely.   Change by itself is not bad; it is the adaptation to change that is difficult. In the natural world, this slow evolutionary change sometimes takes the pain out of the adaptation process.

Fast forward now to the world of business. Change is rapid in all aspects of business. In the world of technology, we have Moore’s Law, which is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years. Seemingly an inconspicuous observation? Don’t be fooled by its apparent simplicity. This very observation is what causes all of us to be glued to our mobile devices and access so many services electronically which was not even a dream 10 years ago. So most of us cope with this change by accessing services and goods online at our convenience. We have learnt how to use social media and electronic/online games and have identified addictions to them. Companies and individuals that do not adapt quickly are relegated to oblivion. It has nothing to do with size; in fact the bigger they are the harder they fall.

Evolution of Education

So what does all of this have to do with education and productivity? While all of this change has been taking place in the world, some things have remained static. What is the purpose of education? The curricula of the various disciplines have changed from pre-primary to the tertiary level. But have we prepared our students to deal with the psychological stresses that might be peculiar to every generation? According to Ralph Maraj in the Express of May 5th 2019, the education system annually churns out thousands who are ill prepared for adulthood. How does the education system prepare one outside of academics to enter the world of adulthood with all the psychological burdens that come with it? How did previous generations manage? I have no doubts that previous generations would have dealt with various personal and societal upheavals and stresses. But was the stress in a less technological and socially connected world different from that of today?

This goes beyond the stress of examinations only. This has nothing to do with any individual examination such as SEA or University, but generally on preparing students to be productive citizens in the real world outside of academics.

If we are to consider ourselves beings of higher intelligence, then it is necessary for us to refine our education system and teach our students, from the preprimary right up to the workplace, how to deal with the pressures of our modern day life. Just as adults need help with certain aspects of stress, so do children, students and employees. Unproductive behavior may just be a symptom of something deeper.

Coping Mechanisms

Isn’t it time that we began to formally deal with coping mechanisms for children from the young age all the way to University? Would this intervention have a positive impact on our society as a whole? It has been proven in several studies that apart from the formal education, a nurturing and supportive home environment greatly increases one’s chances of succeeding in school. Armed with this knowledge we can now innovate and take the argument one step further to formally engage students in stress management and coping mechanisms. Would this lead to better performance at school, less delinquent behavior and produce an individual better prepared to enter the productive world of work?

Insufficient Productivity

We have several complaints about the lack of productivity. What is the reason for the poor work ethic? Are the problems purely organizational? Is there any room for individual responsibility? Does it have to do with education? What separates a developed country from a developing country? Is it mindset? What causes this inertia? How does one deal with mindset on an individual basis, an organizational basis and at the country level? Is it a deficiency somewhere along the line in our education system that has caused some to fall through the cracks? How do we now address this?

Do the denominational schools have a better approach to the students or is it the home and family support that allows the students to succeed in the denominational school? What is the driver of the individual motivation? What is the difference between the approaches in the denominational vs the government schools? Is there room to learn from the other both in and out of classroom lessons?

Existing Knowledge

There are several studies on motivation and leadership and the personality types that shapes an individual’s point of view.  The knowledge and capability to enact such an intervention into the formal school system is already there. The hindrance might just be the logistics at this time. Would such an intervention change our education system from being highly individualistic to more all-inclusive? Time would be the best indicator of this. But if we are creatures of higher learning then shouldn’t we put all of this productive knowledge to some use that gives us some type of competitive advantage? I have no empirical evidence to quote on this, but the idea does not seem so far – fetched to me.

Conclusion

It is not about an entirely altruistic proposal. In the long run, it is about helping society to adapt to the Darwinian Theory which has been greatly sped up outside of the natural world. The society would not fail as a whole, but it is my theory that by this formal engagement of a stress management programme from the school level we are better preparing the future generation for success. Who knows what the new world of Artificial Intelligence, Self Driving cars, Pilot- less planes, Robotics, Inter- planetary travel and unimaginable plastic pollution would unleash on the future generation? What are your views on this?

Bhushan Singh is a Lecturer and Consultant at the Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business

 

 

Meet Dr. Zaffar Khan, Lecturer of MBA in International Trade, Logistics and Procurement

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Dr. Zaffar Khan is the Programme Director of MBA in International Trade, Logistics and Procurement programme at UWI-ALJGSB, he’s also an international advocate for Energy Efficiency, Energy Cost Reduction, Energy Conservation and Clean Energy.

What is the relevancy of the MBA ITLP programme given the current economic climate?

This programme is highly relevant to Trinidad and Tobago and the region in terms of economic diversification, and plays a major role in all sectors from the perspectives of Trade liberalisation, digitisation, logistics and procurement.

 

 

Why should persons choose the MBA in ITLP programme?

  1. It is accredited by the Association of MBAs

2. Over the past five years the programme ranked #1 at UWI-ALJGSB based on the student satisfaction                               surveys.

Graduates from this programme obtained senior positions in the energy sector, other private sector companies            and in the public sector including the Procurement Secretariat. Also, some graduates obtained top positions                internationally.

 

How does the MBA ITLP differ from other supply chain management programmes?

  1. Accreditation and re-accreditation

2. World class  and dedicated faculty

3. Performance measured by the SSS and graduates obtaining  suitable jobs

4. Relevant and up to date research within the Supply Chain body of knowledge

5. Highly successful and relevant practicum projects

 

How can this programme enhance someone’s career?

  1. Promotion within the company
  2. Obtaining jobs in the Supply Chain and Procurement areas
  3. Become entrepreneurs in imports, exports, manufacturing, tourism and agriculture

 

For more information on this programme you can contact Mrs. Shivana Hosein, Academic Advisor of MBA in International Trade, Logistics and Procurement at 645-6700 ext. 103 or email: admissions@lokjackgsb.edu.tt 

Bureau for Intellectual Property of the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Tourism (MTI&T) of Suriname is ISO 9001:2015 Certified

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The UWI Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business of Trinidad and Tobago has successfully executed a Consultancy to provide training to the staff of the Bureau of Intellectual Property and to implement a Quality Management System to ensure that all their systems and  processes meet the requirements of the ISO 9001:2015 standard.

The Project, which involved a collaborative effort of consultants from Trinidad & Tobago and Suriname, commenced in May 2018. The Team drafted IT procedures and QMS administration procedures, while developing quality objectives and manuals to allow the Bureau to operate at an international standard.

The project was funded by the Inter-American Development Bank as part of their commitment to the Caribbean and Latin American Region, to focus on improving governance, innovation and competitiveness. The focus of this loan is to modernize the legal and institutional framework and promote private sector led growth, diversification and innovation in the Government of Suriname.

 

 

For further information, contact the UWI Lok Jack GSB Advancement Centre at 1 (868) 645-6700

Professor Wayne Hunte, Academic Director of the UWI Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business presents the ISO 9001:2015 Certification to H.E Stephen Tsang – Minister of Trade, Industry and Tourism

 

Personnel of the Bureau of Intellectual Property pose with the Minister, Permanent Secretary and Professor Wayne Hunte

Entrepreneurial Challenges in the 21st Century

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Editor:

Dr. Balraj Kistow
Lecturer and Programme Director
Lok Jack GSB

Caribbean societies have quite a few things in common.  In large part we have beautiful tropical flora and fauna, fantastic beaches, a common Euro-centric colonial past, which has influenced our legal, socio-political and administrative systems as well as our trading relations. We also have a common history in the early development of agriculture-based industries as the core of our colonial economic purpose. While some countries have moved away from this sector to varying degrees, we all in some way maintained the same principle of economic development by selling our natural endowments.  When we look at the region, we are either dependent in large parts on tourism, agriculture and oil and gas.  Now don’t get me wrong.  I am thankful for these natural resources as I am sure you are as it have sustained us for generations.  However, our continued path of being overly dependent on these resources by selling it mainly in the primary state does not only derive less values for us but have given rise to much less virtuous commonality in the region, which is, our economic well-being that’s very much vulnerabile to external events and price shocks.

When we look at regional economies we see that our prosperity could quickly turn to poverty with a crash in the fall in the prices of oil and gas, a mad man’s rant that makes people nervous to travel or an arbitrary decision by some major government or supra-national body that severely impede our ability to trade our products and services in the traditional markets.  In the highly globalized, interdependent and connected world of today it is not possible to be totally insulated from the happenings international community.  The question is how do we position our economies to be less vulnerable to these external shocks and events while at the same time creating an entrepreneurial culture in our population that facilitates and empower people to take advantage of events and current trends towards economic prosperity.

This may sound like a tall order and I can hear the less optimistic among us pointing to the reams of paper that have raised this or similar questions before, but we are still in the same place.  That might be true, but time have changed, people are changing, the world is evolving and maybe we need to change our approach and perspective.

The usual approach to trying to move to a more secure and less vulnerable economic platform has been to look to diversification as a solution.  While we have looked in that direction we cannot say we have been able to diversify in any meaningful way.  I am sure there are many components to why we have not fared well in the area of diversification but I feel that an important element is our approach that seems to suggest moving away from traditional sectors rather than an approach that emphasise on using the resources, skill sets, networks and competencies to develop new products, services and sectors.  In this way we can use the traditional sectors as focal points in creating value added solutions for the modern world.

Rather than speaking about moving away from the traditional sectors of agriculture, tourism and energy we should be asking the question as to how can we leverage these sectors such that we are able to create new and exciting products and services on the higher end of the value chain that treats with contemporary trends, issues and challenges.  For instance, rather than see agriculture as a relic from a bygone era maybe we can look to develop selected areas that can serve global and diaspora markets with traditional goods and local delicacies.  In the last few years coconut is the new craze with coconut water being demanded for its isotonic qualities, coconut oil as a health fat for cooking and in beauty products from New York to Paris and coconut flour and sugar selling at premium prices.  A company in Guyana is now canning a local delicacy called “Heart of Palm” or Palmiste, as it is traditionally known in Trinidad and Tobago, for the export market.  The leaves and the fruits of the “Sijan” or Moringa plant is now a global health phenomenon and is being sold on Amazon.  With fish stocks being depleted globally we should have the capacity to develop fish farms that can serve the domestic and international markets and the regional tourism sector.  These are few examples where we can relook, remodel and recreate the agriculture sector to generate wealth and foreign exchange and I have not even touched on the potential of medical marijuana, eco and indigenous tourism and renewable energy.

We cannot continue to see our natural resources as cash cow by being sold as a primary product, but we need to create and foster an entrepreneurial mindset where we see our resources as raw materials that can be used to create high value products.  We all have our parts to play in this regard as there are key roles for academic in research and development among other things, government in creating and maintaining a secure and predictable enabling environment and industry in taking the lead investing in value creating solutions.  Moreover, creating an entrepreneurial mind set would require a systemic change especially to the way we see education and the way we educate as the move to creating this mindset would not happen in the boardroom if it is not inculcated in the classroom. I am not saying this is an easy task as it would require many herculean changes and dealing with many moving parts at the same time, but it is not beyond us.  Frankly, I don’t think we have much of a choice.

Join us at Distinguished Leadership and Innovation Conference and gain insights from Entrepreneurial Gurus – Josh Linkner and Prof. Andrew Corbett on May 6th 2019 at the Hyatt Regency. Register now at www.dlictt.com

 

 

Neisha Ramdass “Energy Bae”

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Neisha Ramdass is a current student of the MBA in Sustainable Energy Management programme at Lok Jack GSB, taking this leap took her career to new heights. Neisha was recently published by the Newsday where she was given the opportunity to moderate and speak at a global energy forum that was held at Panama.

 

Why did you choose the Lok Jack GSB to pursue an MBA?

Coming from a technical background with my BSc, I hoped to diversify my portfolio by pursuing an MBA. ALJ GSB has the best reputation as being one of the top business schools in the country. Upon conducting extensive research on the programmes I was interested in, the feedback I received on the MBA SEM was phenomenal.

Has the MBA SEM programme influenced your professional life? If yes, how?

This programme has afforded me the opportunity to study the energy sector from different perspectives, including business, social, financial, economic, and environmental just to name a few. I have studied energy policy scrupulously and I intend to further my career in this field, since I believe Trinidad and Tobago needs to conduct some serious policy changes within the energy sector in order to achieve sustainability.

Describe your experience with the MBA SEM programme

The experience and wealth of knowledge I gained over the past two years from the SEM programme was invaluable. The all-round view of the energy sector shed a whole new light on the field in which I choose to establish a career in. The knowledge I gained led me down the path of starting and successfully running my very own energy blog (eNRgyTT.com). I believe that the citizens of Trinidad and Tobago deserve to understand their energy sector since we’re a fossil fuel-based economy. The main objective of this blog was to educate in the simplest way possible, allowing for people to formulate their own opinions on a sector which we are heavily dependent on.

Would you recommend persons to pursue the Lok Jack GSB’s MBA in Sustainable Energy Management programme? Why?

I would definitely recommend this programme to those interested because it was one of the best choices I made in my life. Though the programme is gruelling and requires absolute commitment, it was definitely worth it. The lecturers were the best and very experienced in their respective fields. Free-thinking and discussion was always encouraged in the classroom, allowing for my peers and I to become independent thinkers, challenging the norm and formulating our own opinions, instead of simply learning class materials to regurgitate for an exam.

Do you think energy efficiency is well practiced and promoted in Trinidad and Tobago?

Trinidad and Tobago has a very long way to go with regards to energy efficiency and energy conservation. We promote a culture of wastage, mostly as a result of our cheap (SUBSIDIZED) electricity and fuel prices. There have been attempts to promote EE, however, there needs to be a culture shift, which can only come from improved public education and awareness. Energy efficient practices need to be introduced into the curriculum for primary and secondary schools. There needs to be a greater emphasis put on educating the public on climate change and its effects on our country. Citizens should be made aware that their actions today will most definitely cause a huge impact on future generations.

Can you share 3 energy efficient practices for our readers?

Three simple energy efficient practice that can be employed both domestically, as well as in business places:

  1. Switching out CFL and incandescent bulbs with LED bulbs;
  2. Purchase energy efficient appliances;
  3. Conduct energy audits to access where energy is being wasted and where improvements can be made.

Attach YouTube video on EE if possible:

https://youtu.be/ZFgf6cYLwK4

 

To find out more about our MBA in Sustainable Energy Management programme please contact Mrs. Shivana Hosein at 645-6700 ext. 200 or email: admissions@lokjackgsb.edu.tt

UWI-Arthur Lok Jack GSB won two Global Awards from the International Trade Centre

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We are delighted to share that  the UWI-Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business was awarded two global awards from the  International Trade Centre  related to the International Diploma in Supply Chain Management programme. The awards were as follows:  

 

  • 2nd Place for trainer of the year in Supply Chain Management Award  Mr. Nyron Mohammed 
  • 3rd place as training support institution for the MLS-Supply Chain Management programme awards 

 

The International Trade Centre (ITC) is the only development agency that is fully dedicated to supporting the internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).This means that the agency enables SMEs in developing and transition economies to become more competitive and connect to international markets for trade and investment, thus raising income and creating job opportunities, especially for women, young people, and poor communities. 

UWI-ALJGSB and ITC signed an MOU in 2015 to deliver training in Supply Chain Management in Trinidad & Tobago. UWI-ALJGSB have had 8 intakes between 2015 and 2018 in the Supply Chain Management field.  

The SCM programme has 3 levels and each level has 6 courses and is designed to teach students how to manage the sourcing, movement and storage of goods from source of production to point of consumption. For enterprises, this means practical solutions to overcome challenges of export market demands; for buyers, this means optimized sourcing options. Over the past ten years, the Supply Chain Management (SCM) Programme of ITC has helped train over 25,000 students worldwide in 80+ training institutions across 50 countries. 

 

For more information about this programme, please contact Mr. Shadeed Ali- Programme Specialist, Executive Education Unit at 645-6700 ext. 131 or email: s.ali@lokjackgsb.edu.tt  

UWI-Lok Jack GSB Students to join Stanford D. School students in providing solutions to Silicon Valley social issues 

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On April 13th and 20th, 2019 UWI- Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business, University of the West Indies and Stanford D. School students will collaborate via a virtual session in a design thinking anthropology workshop to provide solutions to a social problem from Silicon Valley. Eight students will be selected from each institution. 

As part of the ALJGSB authentic teaching and learning approach, at this class experience students will explore the value of insider (emic) perspective, outsider (etic) perspective, and how inside and outside perspectives might be better harmonized to yield more impactful creative insights and better collaborate given their different blind spots and viewpoints.  

At this session, students from Stanford D. School (USA) will be the ‘insider’ and students from the UWI-Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business in Trinidad and Tobago will be the ‘outsiders’. Together, they will work to understand and provide potential solutions to a social problem in Silicon Valley.   

To join the sessions, students need to apply and be selected based on a determined criterion by the teaching team. Application deadline is April 1st and selected students will be confirmed and notified by April 5th. 

Sessions will be held from 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. each day 

Over the two-day period the selected students will: 

  • Explore how we might understand problems through multiple cultural lenses, as both an insider and outsider 
  • Develop innovative and creative solutions to 1st world challenges 
  • Examine and challenge clichés and stereotypes to understand culture 
  • Reframe research insights into a point of view and preliminary concepts 
  • Develop skills in international networking and building relationships in cross-cultural teams 
  • Explore how you might navigate and nudge cultural power dynamics in design interventions 

 

The teaching team is comprised by : 

Glenn Fajardo (Stanford )  

Lesley-Ann Noel, PhD (Stanford) 

Michael Lee Poy (UWI) 

 

For further information please contact: 

Dr. Richard Ramsawak  r.ramsawak@lokjackgsb.edu.tt 

Michael Gray                  m.gray@lokjackgsb.edu.tt  

 

The Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business has been re-accredited for the maximum period by both ACTT and AMBA

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The UWI-Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business (UWI-ALJGSB) has held programme accreditation for its MBA portfolio from the Association of MBAs (AMBA) since 2003 and institutional accreditation with the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT) since March 15, 2012.  Accreditation was granted for the maximum period in both cases. The local and global accreditation of the School attests to it high quality standards and relevance of its authentic teaching and learning philosophy and curriculum framework.

On February 12th, 2019 the UWI-ALJGSB’s MBA portfolio was again re-accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA) for the maximum period of 5 years.  The ALJGSB has the widest range of globally accredited MBA programmes in the Caribbean, having attained accreditation for its four MBA programmes.

AMBA Accreditation is the global standard for all MBA, DBA and Master’s degrees with AMBA currently accrediting programmes from the top 2% of business schools in over 70 countries. According to the Association of MBAs “AMBA accreditation represents the highest standard of achievement in postgraduate business education and is earned only by the best programmes.”

Students with an AMBA accredited programme have access to a global network of peers, mentors and job opportunities. They could also be selected as the MBA student of the year. In 2017, Shelly Balkissoon from the MBA in International Trade Logistics and Procurement was a runner-up for the MBA student of the year, the only student from the Caribbean in the history of the awards.

The Accreditation council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT) is a regionally and internationally recognized statutory body responsible for the quality assurance of post-secondary and tertiary level institutions, programmes and awards. ACTT accreditation demonstrates the ability of UWI-ALJGSB to meet and/or exceed internationally accepted standards and validates the ability of the Lok Jack GSB to design and deliver high quality academic and non-academic programmes.

ACTT accreditation provides eligible students from Trinidad and Tobago access to Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses (GATE) for the Lok Jack GSB programmes.

To achieve AMBA and ACTT accreditation, the Lok Jack GSB was assessed on different criteria and standards that included the School’s integrity, sustainability and distinctiveness, faculty quality and sufficiency, programme design and leadership. Additionally, the accreditation process examined institutional characteristics such as governance, administrative strength, academic policies and procedures, physical facilities and financial stability.

UWI-ALJGSB is committed to quality assurance and continuous improvement. In keeping with our purpose and mission to reshape business and provide a world-class environment to our students, UWI-ALJGSB seeks to continuously enhance the quality and learning outcomes of its programmes by exposing itself to the scrutiny of the highest reputable accreditation bodies worldwide.

 

For more information on the accreditation of UWI-ALJGSB please contact Dr. Kamla Mungal, Director, Accreditation and Quality Enhancement Centre/Leadership Institute at 662-9894-5 ext. 142.

                                           

About us:

The Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business was established in 1989 as a joint venture between The University of the West Indies and the private sector of Trinidad and Tobago to provide postgraduate education in business and management. Today, Lok Jack GSB is recognised as the premier institution for the provision of business and management education, training and consultancy services in Trinidad and Tobago and the wider Caribbean region. The motto Innovatus Ars Ducendi, means Innovating the Art of Leadership.

 

Lok Jack GSB launches their Professional Certificate in Sustainable Community Development

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On Saturday 19th January 2019, the Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business launched their Professional Certificate in Sustainable Community Development whilst beginning the first class of students. This Professional Certificate in Sustainable Community Development was developed in collaboration with the Ministry of Community Development, Culture and the Arts and has received their full endorsement as a programme for people who currently work in community development as well as those who plan to work or volunteer in this field.

In attendance was The Minister of Community Development, Culture and the Arts , Dr., The Honourable Nyan Gadsby Dollys. At this workshop participants will be equipped with practical tools to meet today’s challenges as community development practitioners and workers with new thinking, strategy and applied solutions for community development. The programme covers various aspects of Community Development such as: personal transformation, innovation and creativity, introduction to sustainable community development, strategic thinking and planning, leadership skills and managing diversity, steps in community engagement, ICT in Sustainable Community Development, Decision making and problem solving, business writing, project management and project monitoring and evaluation amongst others.

There are different facilitators coordinating various courses, these include: Dr. Ron Sookram, Mr. Garvin Sampson, Mr. Cecil Gittens, Mr. Curt Wellington and Mr. Gary Tagallie to name a few. For more information contact Gabrielle Ghany at 645-6700 ext. 115 or email: g.ghany@lokjackgsb.edu.tt

 

 

 

Career Month SUCCESS!

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Lok Jack GSB Career Month took place in June 2018 to prepare students and alumni for the job hunting process, through a number of events and workshops, culminating with the Career Fair on June 30th.

On Tuesday 4th June 2018 the Employer Insight Evening was held in the Sydney Knox Room featuring leaders in the Human Resource and Talent Management fields from 3 Top tier organizations in Trinidad and Tobago

Ms. Chantal Greaves Cowan – Manager; Talent & Cultural Management – Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business.

Ms. Stacy Homer – Director; Human Capital – UNICOMER Trinidad and Tobago

Ms. Mala Gangadeen Ali – Talent Acquisition Manager – RBC Financial (Caribbean) Ltd

Mr. Jason Cummings – Area Vice President, Business Banking North (TT) RBC Royal Bank Trinidad & Tobago Limited

This evening allowed our students and alumni to engage directly with individuals who are the gatekeepers of the human resource of these large companies and find out directly from them what they look for when recruiting for their respective companies.

The evening offered with a mix of featured presentations along with lively interactive conversations and frank questions, which cut straight through to issues and addressed misconceptions with regard to recruitment policies and practices. There was active engagement not only from the persons physically present in the room but also from our online audience, as the event was live-streamed on the Lok Jack GSB Alumni Facebook Page. (https://www.facebook.com/LokJackAlumni/videos/2069112336456553/)

A 3-hour workshop entitled, Making your Resume Standout in the pile, was held on Saturday 9th June 2018. It was attended by 20 persons, including students, alumni and members of the public. This was a rich an informative workshop, which left all participants wanting more and with homework to update their resumes for review by their facilitators.

The workshop was facilitated by Lok Jack GSB’s very own Ms. Fayola Nicholas – Director of Advancement & Alumni Relations and Ms. Clare-Marie Cockburn – Talent Acquisition and Engagement Specialist, who took the participants on a journey of understanding themselves in order to present their best self on their resume, and using the most appropriate format to best present themselves to potential employers.

The final event for this month was the annual Career and Recruitment Fair. Participating in this year’s event was RBC Financial (Caribbean) Limited, Unicomer (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited, Scotiabank Trinidad and Tobago Limited & The Ansa Mcal Group of Companies which represented 8 companies.

At Career Fair 2018 there were over 90 individual applicants, applying for 28 positions. There were over 110 interviews conducted on Saturday 30th June and now we wait to see how many of these vacancies will be filled with Lok Jack GSB Alumni & Students.

The Lok Jack GSB recognizes the changing economic landscape and in our pursuit to continually add value to all our stakeholders, the focus on career preparedness and development for our Alumni and Students is of primary importance to us, and we will continue to ensure that our students and alumni have access to the best resources and opportunities available to advance their careers.

The Lok Jack GSB Advancement and Alumni Relations Team would like to thank all the companies, HR professionals, volunteers and participants who contributed to all the Career Month events, without the participation of all the stakeholders, this month would not have been successful.

Please visit the Alumni Relations webpage on the Lok Jack GSB website for information on other programmes and resources https://lokjackgsb.edu.tt/alumni/, and sign up for our HigherEd talent to have access to international internships and job opportunities https://lokjackgsb.higheredtalent.org.

 

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